Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Let's Be Teammates at WCCLS!

7 people posing with Elvis masks.
This is the team you could join,
if you dare!
Y'all may not be aware how much I love my job but I really, really love it. Which is why I'm SUPER excited to say that WCCLS is hiring an additional Youth Services Librarian II to increase our capacity! Check out the posting below, and follow the link to apply!

Are you passionate about your vocation as a youth services librarian and looking to take the next leap on your career path?  Are you adept at building and maintaining collaborative relationships with library colleagues and community partners?  Are you keyed into youth services trends locally and nationally?  If so, we want to hear from you and encourage you to submit an application packet for this exceptional opportunity!

Washington County Cooperative Library Services (WCCLS) in Washington County, Oregon is in search of a Youth Services Librarian II to complete a collaborative, forward-thinking Youth Services team. WCCLS Outreach and Youth Services works with our 16 member library sites to deliver high-quality services to our county's children and families, a population that continues to grow and change.  In the position of Youth Services Librarian II, you can expect to:

Be a resource and advocate for local youth services staff and the services they provide,
Act as a liaison and voice of local youth services staff to WCCLS leadership,
Create content for countywide campaigns including Summer Reading,
Collaborate with school districts and community partners around shared goals,
Represent WCCLS and our libraries at countywide meetings and events, and
Dream and scheme with the existing Youth Services Librarian II, the Youth Services Library Assistant, and others on the Outreach and Youth Services team to expand programs and execute brand new projects, including those funded by the annual Oregon Ready to Read grant.

To learn more about our program and the services we provide, please visit:  WCCLS Home

We offer a collaborative culture and work-life balance.  Working within our local government agency provides daily opportunities to serve, build and sustain communities now and into the future. In addition to being an affirmative action and equal opportunity employer with a commitment to a diverse and inclusive workforce representing the rich diversity in our region.  Women, minorities, veterans and people with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

ESSENTIAL JOB DUTIES
30%   Coordination of Youth Services Activities - Coordinates countywide youth services activities (ages 0-18) including the Summer Reading program and programs geared to school age children. Provides support for the countywide youth services meetings.  Leads and facilitates group meetings and committees. Provides professional assistance to member libraries through resource sharing, training opportunities, and coaching to develop or expand programs and services for youth and families.  Works with member library youth services staff to propose, implement, and sustain countywide library initiatives. Maintains and expands various kits to be used by member library staff.

30%   Community Outreach and Partnerships - Coordinates library outreach to, and training of, child care providers and parents in partnership with countywide community organizations.  Provides early literacy training for child care providers and parents when service by a member library is not possible. Networks with community organizations that provide services to families and children.  Represents countywide youth services librarians at county/regional networking meetings. Acts as a resource on library service to youth for community partners.  Acquires and maintains necessary early literacy curriculum certification and training.

20%   Other - Develops content for print and electronic resources.  Creates and delivers presentations and print pieces to promote countywide youth services. Prepares monthly statistical reports on services and activities. Selects and orders necessary supplies. Assists in the development of the youth services budget.  Actively participates in local, regional, state and national organizations and professional groups that provide early literacy, young adult and youth services.

15%   Grant Management – Shares responsibility for managing the annual Oregon State Ready to Read non-competitive grant. Develops and sustains projects created through Ready to Read Grant funds. Coordinates the grant application and reporting process with 4 member libraries. Researches and applies for grants to support program goals as appropriate.

5%   Supervision – May employ direct supervision over assigned staff including training and mentoring.  May act as person-in-charge in absence of Senior Librarian.

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS AND ABILITIES
Education and Experience
A typical way to obtain the minimum required knowledge, skills and abilities for this vacancy would be:

A Master's level education in Library Science from an accredited American Library Association (ALA) program or related field; and
Two years of recent and relevant professional level library experience providing youth services.
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Click here to view the job ad and apply! Give yourself ample time to answer the supplemental questions. The position opening closes July 16th.

I know you want to apply. We'v got so much good work to do together!

Friday, June 02, 2017

Full-Time Library Staff: A Community Investment

Icons on a green background: human reading in black, a grouping
of people in gray. Text reads: "Full Time Library Staff: A Community Investment"

Lately there's been an underlying theme of the value of staff in online conversations I've encountered. If you haven't already, please go read "Grit? Git!" by April Hathcock, this tweetstorm on the realities of salary compensation by Lisa Hinchliffe, and "The Emotional Labor of Librarianship" by Julie Jergens. I'll wait.

EDIT 6/7: AND OH CRAP PLEASE READ "Vocational Awe?" by Fobazi Ettarh.

These posts have refueled some thoughts I've had for awhile on the social sustainability of librarianship: namely, recruitment and retention. And a few recent posts on a Facebook group I follow have underscored the reality of a large portion of librarianship today: working at several jobs with few hours, sometimes volunteering (I'm sure when some imagine a part time employee, they think of an employee juggling 2 twenty-hour positions; but in my conversations it's more like 4-7 different jobs at 5-10 hours per week each). Doing this wherever you can find a library job, sometimes thousands of miles away from your support network, driving up to 2 hours to get the job you found. Not being able to afford to take trips to see family or friends, little to no sick or vacation time, not qualifying for employer-offered insurance. When a sustainable, full-time librarian position opens up, you might be passed over for any number of related and frustrating reasons: Little to No Real Experience, Job Hops, Why Would This Person Want This Job When They Live Far Away?

The hiring end has its own frustrations with this reality. Often, really great candidates turn into beloved employees, only to leave less than a year later because they finally got that full time job. While it's true that money is saved in the form of the former employee's wages, job searches are extremely costly and it can be difficult to get people to cover the desk or other duties when you're down a staff member during this process. Sometimes it's "easier" to just get rid of the position.Which is totally understandable when budgeting-slashing time comes around, if we're being honest.

This is not a sustainable model, and it's not a model where productivity and morale thrive.